THE DRUID’S CURSE OF MOOREHALL

Moore Hall Front

Overlooking Lough Carra in County Mayo stands the burned out family manor of one of the most influential families in Ireland.  A burned out shell that has touched on the worst parts of Irish history and was said to have been built on an ancient curse.

George Henry Moore was a prominent Irish Politician in the eighteenth century and both he and his descendants rose to distinction in military, political and cultural fields. Moore himself emigrated to Spain following the implementation of the penal laws and rose to prominence gaining a place in the Spanish Court.  He set up a business trading in brandy and fine wines, which afforded him the luxury of having enough money to build his own mansion upon returning to Ireland.

With many sites to choose from, George Moore settled on Muckloon Hill overlooking Lough Carra.  Locals vehemently warned against such a location as the land was deemed to be cursed.  In around 400 A.D The King of Connacht, Brian Orbsen was slain by his enemies.  The King’s Druid, Drithliu, however made good his escape.  He sought sanctuary on Muckloon Hill but failed to outrun his pursuers who caught up with him and Drithliu bled out on the shores of the Lough.

The stubborn landowner went ahead regardless and Moorehall was built by Waterford Cathedral architect John Roberts, with Moore taking up residency in 1795.  Shortly afterwards George Henry Moore suffered a stroke and was left blind. And so the curse of Moorehall had begun.

George’s son John trained as a lawyer and was made President of Connacht which was a Republic at the time of his commission in 1798.  Unfortunately, his position was a short-lived affair following the appointment of Command-In-Chief of Ireland, the1st Marquess Cornwallis in direct response to the Irish Rebellion.  John was arrested by the Lord Lieutenant and was given the death penalty.  George Moore used some of his fortune to secure the best lawyers he could find and had his son’s sentence commuted to a deportation order.  While on remand awaiting the transport ship John succumbed to the injuries he sustained in custody.  Just a few months later George Moore was also dead.  The curse had struck again.

The next owner of Moorehall was also named George Henry Moore.  His money was made in horseracing yet not without tragedy.  In 1845 his brother Augustus was jockeying a horse by the name of Mickey Free in the English Grand National.  He fell from his horse during the race and died.   George himself won the Gold Cup the following year and used the money to buy grain and cattle for his famine struck tenants.  It was documented that not one of the people on Moore land became victims of the Famine.

George Augustus Moore was to be the last resident owner of Moorehall and the great grandson of the man who had built the very same.  Born in 1852, he went on to study the arts and become a prolific writer as well as a founder of the Abbey Theatre.  George’s social circle included Oscar Wilde, folklorist Lady Gregory and occultist and esteemed writer W. B Yeats, all regular visitors to his grand ancestral home.

George Augustus Moore

While George was residing in England at the height of the Irish Civil War, the anti-treaty IRA took umbrage at his cousin Maurice’s political stance and after commandeering Moorehall, set the mansion with explosives and burned it out.  Was this the final part of the curse?

Apparently not.

The facade remains, exposed to the elements.  Creeping tentacles of ivy crawl through the dark soulless voids where the windows once reflected the beauty of the sky and the Lough.  If you pass through the undergrowth and the age weary tunnel at the rear of the once majestic building, you can see the lowest level of Moorehall, left much as it was in 1923, whatever remains within peering up into the twenty first century sky.

Visitors to the cursed site describe ominous sensations and the overwhelming feeling that they are being watched by some unseen presence.  There have been reports of hearing children’s laughter and seeing shadows darting through the remaining structure. The woods themselves that encompass the fallen noble home are said to have an oppressive and foreboding silence within them.

Historic tragedy has befallen the residents of Moorehall over generations, which has directly led to accounts of paranormal activity within the ruins and the tale of a serpent like creature known as a péist dwelling in the waters of Lough Carra. It should also not be forgotten that the Moore family are interred close by in their ancestral vault. Included is John Moore who’s body was not located until the mid-twentieth century where he was brought home and laid with his kin following a full military send off.

Moore grave

So could the murder of an ancient Druid on Muckloon Hill have created a curse so strong that is has spiraled down through the centuries?  Is part of that curse that the Moores’ remain in residence for eternity? No one will ever know for sure.  No one but a Druid named Drithliu.

 

 

 

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WITCHES OF IRELAND PART 1 – ALICE KYTELER, THE BLACK WIDOW OF KILKENNY

alice

Long before the publication of Malleus Maleficarum, attention was brought to bear on the small medieval town of Kilkenny in the Kingdom of Ossory.  One of the earliest ever recorded witch trials took place in the early 14th century against a local businesswoman and serial bride by the name of Alice Kyteler – and what a sensational trial it was.

So who was the local entrepreneur and femme fatale who caused uproar in the Irish legal system and brought the Ecclesiastical authorities of Ireland to their knees?

THE BLACK WIDOW

Alice Kyteler’s family were Flemish brokers and they had settled in Kilkenny sometime towards the end of the 13th century with just one child, a daughter.  Alice learned the ropes of the family business and grew up to be very shrewd, so it came as no surprise that her first husband was an affluent local businessman and financier by the name of William Outlaw.

Believed to have married in 1280 when Alice would have been only sixteen or so, they went on to have a son, also called William.  The banker’s wife groomed her son for great things and by an early age he had gained positions of authority within the local community.  By 1302 William’s father was dead and Alice was already onto her second marriage.  Husband number two was another moneylender by the name of Adam le Blund, from the market town of Callan on the Kilkenny/Tipperary county borders.

Both parties were already wealthy before the union, however marriage brought them a new level of power and prosperity.   The couple’s wealth and status had left feelings of acrimony running high in the parish and rumours had already began to circulate that Alice’s first husband had not died from natural causes.  The locals were convinced that Alice and Adam had in fact, committed murder.

The fire of fear and distrust aimed at Alice Kyteler was beginning to take hold, however it would appear that Alice and the events surrounding her insisted on adding fuel to the growing flames.  In 1307, Adam le Blund relinquished all legal entitlement to his own wealth and gave what was effectively full Power of Attorney to his stepson William, together with the complete nullification of William’s debts agreements.  This incident was deemed all the more suspicious as Adam had offspring of his own from a prior marriage and was in seemingly good mental and physical health.  Two years later he was dead.

1309 saw Alice wed for the third time.  Richard de Valle was an affluent landowner from the neighbouring county of Tipperary and once again the marital union was short lived.  A seemingly fit and well Richard died mysteriously, leaving all his wealth to Alice.  The son of the unfortunate deceased, also called Richard, kept hold of the assets and was the subject of legal proceedings, as the widow demanded her rightful wealth.

By the time Alice Kyteler married yet another wealthy landlord, Sir John le Poer, the local rumour mill was in overdrive and the whispering of foul play continued.  In frighteningly similar circumstances to her first three husbands, John’s health began to decline, in spite of his relatively young age.   John’s finger nails and toe nails were discolouring and falling out, he was rapidly going bald, and the little hair he had left was devoid of pigmentation.  As his ailments increased and his already poor health took a decided turn for the worse, two game changing events took place.  First of all, with no regard for his own blood kin, John made a will bequeathing all his money and assets to Alice and her son William.  The second, fearing for his life, John turned to the church for help. By 1324 he was dead and the whispers had turned to shouts of witchcraft.

KYTELER’S INN

kytelers-inn

Despite marrying prosperous landowners, Alice insisted that she remain in her birthplace on St. Kieran’s Street in Kilkenny.

As a rich wife and ultimately an incredibly wealthy serial widow, Alice did not need to work, however her focus was on building and maintaining a thriving business.  She continued with her practice of moneylending, made easier by having the perfect location to conduct her affairs.

Kyteler’s Inn wasn’t just any old hostelry. It was a meeting place for local businessmen who all vied for the attention of the bewitching Alice, showering her with gifts and money.   It should therefore come as no surprise that this was the very place Alice set eyes on her ill-fated husbands to be.

Whilst the attention of so many of the wealthy local male population was scintillating for Alice, she was a canny businesswoman first and foremost.  She hired the most luscious and alluring of young women to work in her premises, enticing men from their wives and responsibilities and spending their money in Kyteler’s Inn, making her establishment the most successful in Kilkenny.

It was also here in the inn that Alice was said to work her sorcery and that her patrons were bewitched by Alice and her alleged coven.

SORCERY, THE CHURCH AND THE LAW

Contrary to popular belief, the Church often turned a blind eye to sorcery, accepting that some forms of Malficium were minor offences and that the medical benefits offered by those who practiced such arts outweighed the ‘crime’.  As such, any issues relating to witchcraft were dealt with by the local authorities and not the Church, except in the case of direct heretical doctrine.

Unfortunately for Alice, this all changed when Pope John XXII came to the Papal Throne in 1316.  He was genuinely terrified of witchcraft and was convinced his life was in jeopardy, leading to the granting of sweeping powers to his Inquisitors.

Pope John XXII published a definitive list of practices that would constitute heresy and subsequent prosecution by the Church, particularly in relation to demon worship and pacts with the devil.

pope-john-xxii

Unfortunately for Alice, this canon law reached Ireland and in particular, Richard Ledrede, the Bishop of Ossory.

ACCUSATIONS, ARRESTS AND ABSCONDING

Whether out of bitterness of being cheated from their respective inheritance or genuine concern that Alice Kyteler was indeed a witch, the children of her last three deceased husbands joined together and called upon the assistance of Richard Ledrede.

Richard was a devout Christian and fanatical with seeking out and punishing heretics.  He was unhappy that respect for the Church and canon law were fading and that the law of the land took precedent.  He had the necessary background to implement Church doctrine and proceed with charges of heresy against Alice and her son William Outlaw, however he was up against resistance from local law enforcement and Alice’s very powerful contacts.

Having heard the allegations from Alice’s stepchildren, Ledrede went ahead and charged Alice, her maid Petronella and her son William with heresy.  The charges included denying the Faith, desecration of the church with black magic rituals, sorcery, demonic animal sacrifice, murder, controlling members of the local community with potions and spells and fornicating with a demon known by many names including Robin Artisson, in exchange for power and prosperity.

Richard’s first attempt at arrest was thwarted by the Chancellor of Ireland, Roger Outlaw, a relative of Alice’s first husband.  He advised Ledrede that there could be no warrant issued for the arrests without the accused having first been excommunicated for at least 40 days and a public hearing.  Meanwhile the well timed intervention of another relation by marriage, Sir Arnold de Poer, senior steward of Kilkenny allowed Alice to flee to Dublin and saw the imprisonment of Richard Ledrede.

While Richard was in prison, the whole of the diocese of Ossory saw an embargo on funerals, baptisms and marriage.  As the majority of the population believed in Hell and eternal damnation, the public outcry was too much and the Bishop of Ossory was released.

Incarceration left Ledrede incensed and he heightened his efforts to prosecute Alice, her son and maid by involving the Justice of Ireland, who insisted upon a full witch trial.

William Outlaw pleaded guilty to the charges of heresy, illegal money lending, adultery and perverting the course of justice.  His punishment was to attend three masses a day, donate to the poor and agree to reroof the cathedral with lead.

WITCH

In the meantime, Alice had absconded and the trial continued in her absence.  The alleged depths of her depravity and heresy began to be revealed to the court.  The witch Kyteler was said to have used a human skull to brew her potions, with ingredients including parts of corpses, the innards of fowl, worms and insects and the clothing of deceased infants.  The concoctions were said to rouse her innocent victims to do her bidding, with acts of love, hatred or murder.

Alice and her coven were said to have conducted black masses in the churches, sacrificed and dissected livestock to bargain with demons at crossroads and Alice herself was accused of continued carnal relations with a powerful demon in order to maintain her position of influence over the local community.

The final accusations were of the murder of each of her four husbands.  Evidence regarding her last husband, John le Poer was put forward.  He had no nails, they were ripped from their beds and left bleeding, all bodily hair had fallen out and he was completed withered away to a skeleton at the time of his death.

While Alice had disappeared, some say to England with the help of her well positioned male acquaintances, her maid was not so fortunate.

Petronella de Meath was tortured repeatedly in Kilkenny Jail until she confessed to being a witch and a member of the coven of Alice Kyteler.  On 3rd November 1324, Petronella was the first woman in Ireland to be burned at the stake as a witch.

burning-at-the-stake

THE LEGACY OF ALICE KYTELER

So what of Alice? Well Alice Kyteler was never heard of again – whether she used witchcraft to cloak her whereabouts or was helped abroad by calling on infatuated men of position we will never know.

What we do know, is that the accusations and the trial were very real indeed.  They remain documented as they have been for centuries and the trial changed the balance of law and power back in favour of the Church.

The most exciting revelation of this account is that the locations remain.  The Jail still stands, bars on windows.  As you stand on the street, peering into the eerie darkness of the cold, cramped cells, a shiver runs up your spine at the realization there could be something ethereal staring back at you, perhaps the tormented blackened soul of Petronella de Meath.

Kyteler’s Inn is still the most famous hostelry in Kilkenny and the spirit of Alice is said to remain, watching over her establishment and the revelers within for eternity.

So was Alice Kyteler indeed a witch, or just the most successful and richest business woman in medieval Ireland? Perhaps if you come across her in Kyteler’s Inn, you can ask her yourself!

alice-sculpture

I shall leave you with Alice, immortalised in the words of W. B Yeats:

"A sudden blast of dusty wind and after
Thunder of feet, tumult of images,
Their purpose in the labyrinth of the wind;
And should some crazy hand dare touch a daughter
All turn with amorous cries, or angry cries,
According to the wind, for all are blind.
But now wind drops, dust settles; thereupon
There lurches past, his great eyes without thought
Under the shadow of stupid straw-pale locks,
That insolent fiend Robert Artisson
To whom the love-lorn Lady Kyteler brought
Bronzed peacock feathers, red combs of her cocks."

 

 

MACABRE MONTPELIER HILL – WELCOME TO DUBLIN’S HELLFIRE CLUB

Mount Pelier House

Montpelier Hill is an ancient mound in the County of Dublin.  Its original title has long been forgotten and it got its current name from the hunting lodge built upon it.  That hunting lodge became a meeting place for the Hellfire Club.

MOUNT PELIER LODGE

In 1725, Speaker of the House of Commons in Ireland, William Conolly erected a hunting lodge at the top of what is now known as Montpelier Hill.  By building on top of an ancient burial site and using stones from the remaining cairn, the project was never going to be blessed – no one however, expected the portents of darkness to happen so soon.

With the construction almost completed, including the use of a Menhir for the mantle of the great fireplace, the roof detached and was destroyed in high winds.  Locals at the time believed it to be the work of the Devil in punishment for the desecration of sacred ground.

The roof was replaced with one in an arch formation and the property was complete.  The lodge was hardly used however and Conolly died in 1729.

In around 1737 members of a secret sect leased the premises from the remaining Conolly family. In a strange twist, the land on which the lodge was built was purchased from Phillip, Duke of Wharton, original founder of the renowned Hellfire Club.  A man whose lifestyle had led him into debt and alcoholism and forced him to sell his Irish estates.

'The Hellfire Club, Dublin' portrait in the National Gallery of Ireland

‘The Hellfire Club, Dublin’ portrait in the National Gallery of Ireland

HELLFIRE CLUB

There were several Hellfire Clubs throughout Britain and Ireland.  Members were of Libertine persuasion and indulged in drinking, debauchery and occult practices including ritual sacrifice.  The Dublin branch of this illustrious cadre was established by Richard Parsons, the 1st Earl of Rosse and James Worsdale, a portrait artist and chancer.

Parsons was a Libertine and founder of the sacred sect of Dionysus.  He was also twice elected Grandmaster of the Irish Freemasons.  Worsdale on the other hand, had little to offer in pedigree and relied on his personality and own liberal approach to life to move in the most exclusive circles, his only real legacy being his portrait, ‘The Hellfire Club, Dublin, hanging in the National Gallery of Ireland.

Here, as with all of the clubs, as well as identical practices and the mascot of a black cat, there were traditions to be upheld.  The Hellfire gents would toast the Devil with a potent punch known as scaltheen, a heady mix of whiskey and rancid butter, whilst leaving an empty seat at the table for his arrival.

One famous tale tells of a stranger entering the club and joining the men for a game of cards.  When retrieving a fallen card, a startled club member saw the guest had cloven hooves – on recognition the dark stranger vanished in flames.

This story is identical to the one from the infamous Loftus Hall in Wexford, however it seems more than coincidence as the family had property on Montpelier Hill also.

There were reports of murder and animal sacrifice, including that of a black cat who was exorcised by a priest and a demon was seen fleeing.  Further tales abounded of a member, Simon Luttrell who allegedly sold his soul to the Devil in order to clear his debts, to be collected in seven years.  The Devil arrived at the Lodge to collect his bounty, however the resourceful Luttrell diverted the attention of his soul reaper and escaped for many more years.

During this period in the club’s history, a horrendous fire took hold during a meeting and several lives were lost.

The exact cause of the fire is unknown, yet claims have been made of everything from a footman accidentally spilling a flammable drink to the deliberate act of the members due to a non-renewal of lease.

Either way, the club moved premises to the Steward’s House some short distance down the hill.  Now the remains of the Lodge stand in ruins, but not abandoned, at least not by the living.

The screams of a woman being bowled to her death in a burning barrel echo over the hill, a smell of brimstone fills the air and invisible hands grabbing at throats to tear off jewellery are just some of the claims of paranormal activity at the top of Montpelier Hill.

hellfire-club

STEWARD’S HOUSE

Steward's House, also known as Kilakee House

Steward’s House, also known as Kilakee House

Built in around 1765, the property became a welcome replacement for the burned out lodge as a meeting place for the Club where the depraved practices continued until the Hellfire club was extinguished with the demise of notorious member and revivalist of the same, Thomas “Buck” Whaley.

In the late 1960’s workers began repairs and renovations to the Steward’s House and witnessed many apparitions including that of a man in black believed to be the priest who exorcised the cat at the Hellfire Club at Mount Pelier Lodge.

Further sightings were made of nuns alleged to have participated in black masses on the hill and a black cat with glowing red eyes.

Other activities include hearing the sounds of bells ringing and poltergeist activity.  In 1971 a plumber carrying out work unearthed a grave containing the remains of a child or small human, thought to be a ritual sacrifice of the brethren of the Hellfire Club.

MASSY’S ESTATE

In the late 19th century, the Massy family of Limerick took ownership of Kilakee House and surrounding land on Montpelier Hill.  In a cruel twist reminiscent of those involved with the Hellfire Club, the party loving Baron Hugh Massy who inherited the property from his family was declared bankrupt, becoming known as the Penniless Peer.   The house itself was destroyed upon repossession.

With the exception of the Steward’s House which is privately owned, the area on Montpelier Hill including the Hellfire Club site and remaining cairn form Lord Massy’s Estate, open to the public.

The subject of many paranormal investigations, the Lodge, Steward’s House and surrounding Massy woods remain a place of mystery with little documented evidence to verify many of the stories and alleged events, largely due to the isolation and secrecy of the Hellfire Club.

That said, when you build a lodge by desecrating a sacred burial site, then invite members of the one of the darkest and debauched societies in history to carry out their Devil Worship in that location, macabre occurrences are guaranteed.

Massy woods

So look for your proof as needs be, although perhaps searching for protection from the Devil would be more prudent – and if you smell brimstone, run, before you become a permanent member of the Hellfire Club.